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20121205
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young leader kim jong-un domestically. >> absolutely. they have been trying since 1998 to launch a long-range missile and they failed in the previous four attempts. they succeeded in this. it's not a rocket that can deliver a major warhead. there are marriajor hurdles to >> they have done in north korea where a lot of people are starving what south korea has been unable to do. >> by choice, actually. >> they haven't launched a satellite into orbit. >> south korea has not. this will undoubtedly spur competition with south korea. you'll see that. you'll probably see south korea respond with more batteries and japan will probably already do that. you have heard that we need to spend more. we spend $10 million a year already on a missile system. it has international ramifications that are going to destabilize. this is why the security council is condemning the move. >> so how much of a real threat to the united states, whether hawaii or the west coast, is this? >> we are not threatened any more today than we were yesterday. let me give you one example. iran put a satellite in orbit in 2009.
. and we're just five days away from when kim jong-il passed away. so there's a symbolic importance for them doing this now. so this is the furthest they've gotten. so we have to keep an eye the closer they get. they have clearly made progress. >>> in other news this morning, and to capitol hill, the slow progress being made toward a fiscal compromise in this country that would avoid tax hikes for all of us come next year. president obama and house speaker john boehner spoke about the stalemate by phone last night. mr. obama has cut his demand for new revenue from tax hikes but continues to insist on higher taxes for the wealthy. boehner's counter offer was almost what republicans have been offering all along, $800 billion in tax revenues, none of them generated by higher tax rates. that stalemate is causing irritation for the senate female members. starting in january, there will be 20 of them, a new record. and they told diane sawyer if they were in charge, well, a deal would already be done. >> what i find is with all due deference to our male colleagues that women's styles tend
obviously make the entire region much more unstable. jon: and for those who wondered whether kim jong-un had staying power as leader of north korea, he just bought himself a whole lot of time in that job, didn't he? >> well i think he showed that the capability of the north koreans has been underestimated and i think you're right. this will be a political boost for him but let's be clear. this rocket-testing program and the work with iran have been going on for decades and they have had some notable failures but each failure tells them something and each success tells them something. if they can put a payload into orbit which we concede they have apparently done, in effect they're well on the way to putting a nuclear payload anywhere on the planet. jon: two members of the original axis of evil still working together. ambassador john bolton, thank you. >> thank you. jenna: we're going to turn to some news a little closer to home now. we're following some major developments in michigan after governor rick snyder signed two bills into law making michigan the nation's 24th right it work state. n
for the second time since kim jong-un took power. and these are brand-new pictures from the capital in a clear display of propaganda there. the white house is far less jovial, calling the launch a threat to regional security. nbc's ian williams is live for us. he is watching the developments from beijing. ian, good morning to you. >> reporter: good morning, lynn. and yes, the north koreans have once again defied international warnings and launched what they describe as a rocket carrying a satellite into orbit, but which the u.s. and most outsiders regard as a thinly disguised test of a ballistic missile. now, the rocket was fired this morning shortly before 10:00 a.m. local time. it went on a trajectory over the japanese island of okinawa and quickly provoked expressions of anger and outrage from japan and korea, which convened meetings of security officials. the u.s. described it as a provocative act threatening regional security. now, north korea, for their part, quickly said that it was a success, that the satellite is in orbit, unlike a test earlier this year when the rocket burned up on l
while now since kim jong-un has taken over. i just want to ask him has been any sign that north korea's military and security policy strategy hasn't changed since he is come on board, or reduce it as a continuation of how they act in their approaches under his predecessors? >> well, i think we're still in the wait-and-see stages. there had been, i believe you can take a look at the last number of months. there have been i think a number of signs that might lead you to believe that the new regime leadership is going to take a more, i would say rational approach to how to deal with their own economy and how they deal with their own people, and how they deal internationally. and so i think generally there's been a feeling that there might be some hope there. however, now we are approaching, once again, a potential violation of a u.n. security council resolution, and we encourage the leadership in north korea to consider what they are doing here and implications in the overall security environment on the korean peninsula, as well as destination. >> anything new? we been hearing some rumbl
, kim jong-un, would pick a different path than his father, that he would be more moderate. i think still there's possibilities of dialogue. i'm not sure when. i think he did this for domestic reasons. the last missile launch failed. he only has one year in leadership. he wants to show his people that despite their economic problems, they have military and missile technolo technology, that they're a major power in space, militarilmilita buttress themselves with the north korean military. it was mainly a domestic shot he took, but also he said to the world, you have to deal with me. i'm a major player. >> so it's for domestic audience largely here. should the united states and should others be worried this launch could mean there's a capability to hit the western coast of the united states? is that a concern what actually was accomplished here beyond the politi politics? >> it was a violation of missile launches, number one. so there will be action by the security council. i don't think they have the capability to reach the united states right now, but obviously, their missile techno
and then suddenly on calendar, e for many, and kim jong-il got very lucky. the three latest attempts had all failed. and this one appears, appears to be a success. something is in orbit. >> we know the rocket range is something like 5,000, 6,000 kilometers. what does the distance tell you? >> well, it is technology. it is a three stage rocket. that's what is significant here. >> tells you it is advanced. >> this is 1950s scud technology they built, a lot of people thought they would never get this far with it. but they made incremental advances. so in that sense, it poses a threat. remember, while they were celebrating in the streets of pyongyang, there were probably also celebrating in the control rooms in iran because those two share their missile technology. >> what about ally, china? china -- >> that was a big surprise. >> let me quote, expressed regret, quote/unquote. regret from china? >> china has been their backer, tried to support them quietly in all these talks. but for them to come out today and say we regret that this happened -- >> north korea further isolating themselves. >> further i
the fireworks and sure enough, they had great timing there in north korea. kim jong-un probably did this to honor his father whose death is this coming when i read the white house statement, i read, oh, wait, didn't i write this in 2006, because it's basically the same language that america has been use not guilty its foreign policy with north korea for years. >> brian: that rocket is just the technology from the '60s, the soviet era '60s, just a little juiced up. >> for us, looking at it, it is a concern because if they do get better technology and if they're rockets reach one of our allies or even all the way across the pacific to us, that obviously is a major problem. but this looks different from inside north korea with state television. this is a big deal to them. it means a lot. >> gretchen: we saw them celebrating. something that wasn't celebrated was the mob action that was going on in michigan yesterday with these protests about the state becoming a right to work state and a lot of people who support the unions were against this. it was interesting because president obama w
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8